Family Histories (66)

Thursday, 05 January 2017 21:11

New Year's Celebration in the 1950s - By Gloria Mendoza

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Thinking back to New Year's Eve when I was young. New Year's Eve in the morning my mother would wake everyone up to clean house. Once done her and her sister would start making food, finger foods, finger sandwiches, dips, Posole & chile, cakes and other goodies. Then they would send my Dad for beer, wine, whiskey and Champagne. My Mom had a little savings just for this occasion. We used to look for change in the couches and all over the house to help her "change" savings. Tonight was a very special night. We had to be in bed by 10:00 p.m. We had to rush and get everything done by then.....Why?......because people, mostly relatives and friends were coming to sing Las Mananitas to my Dad...after all it is the Feast Day of Los Manueles....my Dad's name was Manuel. They would come serenading at our doors and windows singing and playing guitars and violins. We would wake up, greet them, feed them and then the music, dancing and drinking began. My mother served a special drink to the women (her and my Aunt made it up) it was called greenie. Lime sherbert, ginger ale and vodka in a punch bowl. It was a house full of people, singing and they would stay until close to noon time on New Year's Day. All the kids slept on the floor of our bedrooms. Talk about celebrating. Now my family got used to coming over and playing board games for New Year's. We enjoy this better than any other type of celebration. My kids and grandkids are smart.....they don't drink and drive. Always a designated driver if they do drink. I wish you all a wonderful year and slow down on your drinking if you are going to drink. Be sociable.......don't get all locos and locas......lol. HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!!!!!!!

Saturday, 17 December 2016 15:53

Christmas Memories in the 1950s - By Gloria Mendoza

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So many memories of Christmas back in the 50s and 60s. As an elementary aged kid, we would wake up early Christmas morning, go to church and come home. We were more excited about grabbing our nicely washed and folded flour sack, that Mom had waiting in the kitchen. We would grab our flour sack and go house to house saying our little verse of "Angelito's Somos". Our neighbors and relatives, who lived in the neighborhood, would fill our sacks with oranges, apples, candy, cookies, popcorn balls, and some with a little prayer printed on a card. I remember smelling the coffee brewing on the wood stoves of some of my Aunts who never wanted a gas stove. The smell of wood used in the wood stoves as we walked around the neighborhood. We would finally get home,, eat breakfast and finally open gifts. Never more than two gifts each. As we got older, if it snowed, we would go skiing. NO?..not at the ski basin. That was for privileged kids. We would ski holding on to the bumpers of cars and wipe out on the sewer caps which melted the snow. They were on the street. Oh what fun we had. The drivers knew we were holding on to the bumpers, so they would drive slow and wave as we went back to get in line to grab onto another bumper. This is a memory that goes back about almost 60 years. What memory do you have?

Saturday, 26 March 2016 16:15

Good Friday Tradition - By Gloria Mendoza

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Been up since 5:00 a.m. Today is my Lenten meal day. Here's my menu: Beans w/chicos, salmon patties (rellenos de pescado) w/green chile, torrejas w/red chile, quelites (spinach), macaroni w/tomato and cheese, calabasitas (zucchini squash w/corn), sopa w/caramel syrup and capiratoda (sopa w/a milk syrup), peach dessert. This is a traditional meal I grew up with every Holy Thursday and Good Friday. My mother would cook for two days. She would bring out her small glass scalloped dessert dishes and serve everything she made in individual dish, cover the food with a clean, new tea towel and cover the food with it. She set all these up on a tray. The recipients of our meal would then clean each dish and fill them up with what they cooked for that day and send to our home. A tradition which has died and which I try to keep alive. I am now teaching my granddaughters and daughter-in-laws our tradition and recipes. At twelve o'clock sharp we stop all we are doing and pray the rosary. For 3 hours nobody in my house can here music, watch TV, and concentrate on the crucifixion of Our Lord and thank HIM for dying for our sins. This, my friends, are the traditions I grew up knowing. I try to pass all this on to my family. God bless your families as we ready for the resurrection of Our Lord Jesus Christ. HAPPY EASTER! ✝

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