Tuesday, 13 March 2012 19:51

Around the Plaza in the 1930's and 40's

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The following two photographs are of the original Mayflower Cafe on the south side of the Plaza. This restaurant was opened by Tom and Peter Pomonis (both were immigrants from Greece) in 1932. As one can see Goodman's Men's store was directly to the west of the restaurant. Directly to the east was the Capital City Cafe owned by John Ligits. The original Mayflower was decorated with cafe curtains at each booth for privacy (drinking hootch during Prohibition?) After Prohibition was repealed my father, Tom, told me that the restaurant was issued Santa Fe liquor license # 1The Pomonis brothers expanded the Mayflower into the Capital City Cafe in 1939 converting the old Mayflower to a cocktail lounge of the same name (Mayflower.) My father Tom operated the restaurant alone after his brother Peter died in 1941. The restaurant was given a contract to feed the draftees during WW II. Two meals a day were served to 75-125 draftees daily. After the war My father brought in as partner a young veteran of WW II named Angelos Klonis (Angelo eventually opened the famous SF bistro "Evangelos.") The restaurant remained in business until 1954. I personally worked during the summer months and holidays at the restaurant from the time I was 12 years of age where I peeled potatoes, scrubbed pots and pans, washed dishes, bused dishes, short order cook, waiter and cashier until 1953.

From the Santa Fe New Mexican, March 11, 2012.  Promissory note images from Adelina Ortiz de Hill

Friday, 09 March 2012 04:19

Los Alamos home movies 1943 - 1945

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I lived in Los Alamos  from 1947 - 1948.  Right after these movies were made.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkysZPBjzHc&feature=youtu.be

Tuesday, 06 March 2012 05:05

Fray Angelico Chavez

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FRAY ANGELICO CHAVEZ PRESERVED THE HISPANO HISTORY OF NEW MEXICO; WAS ACCOMPLISHED WRITER, ARTIST AND PRIEST 

Few Hispanos in New Mexico’s modern era have done more to preserve the history of the Hispano people of New Mexico than Fray Angelico Chavez, the Franciscan priest, and accomplished writer and artist. Like many Hispanos of the time, Chavez came from humble beginnings. He was born on April 10, 1910 in Wagon Mound, a small community in northeast New Mexico between Las Vegas and Raton. He was the eldest of 10 children born to the home of Fabian Chavez and Maria Nicolasa Roybal de Chavez. His baptismal name was Manuel Ezequiel Chavez, which would later change to Fray Angelico when he was at the Franciscan seminary studying for the Roman Catholic priesthood.

Bizcochitos? Biscochitos?
However you spell it, cookies mean Christmas in New Mexico


Sharon Niederman | For The New Mexican
Posted: Tuesday, December 16, 2008
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In 1989, New Mexico became the first state in the union to adopt an official "state cookie." With that matter put to rest, the Legislature of this great state conducted a debate on the proper spelling of the revered anise-flavored shortbread cookie that appears at Christmas — not to mention weddings, baptisms and quinceñeras

 

Sunday, 04 March 2012 16:32

All Sick Burqueño Speaktionary

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Courtesy of Jim Baca.  I'm lovin' it!

Saturday, 03 March 2012 23:03

Testing Link

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http://www.google.com

www.google.com

test

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