Bert's Burger Bowl: "Scenes for "Two-Lane Blacktop" were shot in the early 70s near the Santa Fé Plaza and at a motel in Santa Fé. The car race scenes were shot on Airport Road. This nighttime scene was shot at Bert’s Burger Bowl. It starred musicians James Taylor and Dennis Wilson."
Movie Locations of the Great Southwest

Tuesday, 24 April 2012 13:53

Exchange hotel ca 1886

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Exchange hotel on left. Seligman brothers on right. Woodblock (?) print ca 1886. Personal collection.

Monday, 23 April 2012 20:46

The Exchange Hotel

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The earliest mention of the Exchange Hotel was by William Becknell, the first American trader to travel what became the Santa Fe Trail, when he arrived in Santa Fe in 1821.  Prior to that, records indicate that there was an inn (fonda) at the location.  During the 19th century, the hotel was known by several names until it was razed in 1919 and rebuilt as today's La Fonda. The Exchange was the hub of social interaction (at least among men) during the last half of the 19th century, boasting a saloon and a billiard parlor that was always active. 

The caption for this photo reads "It is the oldest hotel in the west, and was the hotel at the end of the Santa Fe Trail. Overhead wires for power or communications can be seen attached to the adobe hotel. A covered portal supported by square posts is visible on the left. A workman stands on a ladder at left under the porch roof near a sign reading "Lemp, St. Louis". A dog lies on the ground at the foot of the ladder. The area in the foreground is composed of dirt.  Other legible signs include: ..."Star Tobacco", "Exchange Hotel", "Coca-Cola [...] fountain."

Photo by Reverend George Cole

Ca. 1895-1905

Saturday, 21 April 2012 22:38

Four Generations of Santa Fé Gringos

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Mike Lord, Grace Davis, Anders Lettie and Rachel Lord.

Photo by Kathy Lord

April 21, 2012

Saturday, 21 April 2012 22:35

Three Santa Fé Treasures

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Connie Hernandez, Grace Davis and Adelina Ortiz de Hill.  Inspirations for Voces de Santa Fé.

Photo by Mike Lord

April 21, 2012

Friday, 20 April 2012 02:29

Espanola

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Thursday, 19 April 2012 18:12

St. Francis Basilica Tetragrammaton

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There are a lot of stories floating around about this inscription over the main door of the Cathedral. The following from a blog by David B. Williams covers what I have heard:

While there are some features of the Northern New Mexico experience which have transformed or even diminished in recent years, there are those treasured aspects of the culture  which have endured and should be preserved.  Some of these include the food created from locally grown produce such as the chilé; the distinctive dialects as differentiated from one Spanish-speaking town to another, reflecting the uniqueness of the people in each community; and certainly the arts such as the music, again a story of the people's experiences and life-journeys.   

Long adored for her passion and her talent, and now appreciated for her contribution to that notion that we must not forget from where we came, is 89-year old  Antonia Apodaca.  Antonia was born into a family of musicians in Rociada, NM. A talented guitarist and songwriter and a dynamic button accordion player, she has an extensive repertoire of traditional Hispanic tunes and songs from Northern New Mexico that she learned from her parents and uncles.

If you know  Antonia's music, you know how special she is to Northern New Mexico.  If you are hearing about her for the first time, Voces de Santa Fé is proud to introduce her, as it is the goal of this website to honor and preserve the traditions of our families.

La música de Antonia Apodaca: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKN_HUeyp1o&feature=related

 

Wednesday, 18 April 2012 19:24

When Santa Fe Made Its Own Beer

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 The Santa Fe Reporter , August 6, 1986

Open Door

Charles A. Hannaford and Mike Taylor

When Santa Fe Made Its Own Beer

By 1873 there was an all-time high of 4,131 commercial beer breweries in the United States and almost every town of any consequence had its own brewery and its own beer.  And Santa Fe – even though it was just the capital of a frontier Territory and not even part of a state - was no exception.

Tuesday, 17 April 2012 20:40

The La Fonda Bell Tower

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This photograph shows construction in progress of the La Fonda Bell Tower, circa 1926. The bell tower was designed by John Gaw Meem. This photograph appeared in the book "From Every Window: A Glimpse of the Past" published by the La Fonda. A very special thanks to Jennifer Kimball (Chairman of the La Fonda) and John Rickey (General Manager of the La Fonda) for their permission to publish this photo here on Voces de Santa Fe.

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