Santa Fe (128)

Seligman Brothers--Pioneer Jewish entrepreneurs of Santa Fe and the New Mexico Territory 

by

Arthur (Seligman) Scott

 

 

Please see my article describing the lives of the three original Seligman Brothers, German Jewish immigrants to Santa Fe. Sigmund immigrated  to Santa Fe in 1849 and entered a wholesale-retail mercantile business a year before New Mexico even became a U. S. Territory and while it was still under US Military rule. The business consisted of buying goods in the east and sending them to Santa Fe by wagon to be sold in Santa Fe. The Seligman Brothers store lasted well over a hundred years on the Santa Fe Plaza.

 

The article is posted on the website of The New Mexico State Historian,  reached by  the following link:  http://www.newmexicohistory.org/people/seligman-brothers-pioneer-jewish-entrepreneurs-of-santa-fe-and-the-new-mexi

Wednesday, 09 July 2014 23:50

Santa Fe Trivia Quiz

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Thursday, 22 May 2014 21:03

My Grandfather's Birthplace on the Santa Fe Plaza

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My Grandfather's Birthplace on the Santa Fe Plaza

by

Arthur Scott

   I  recently discovered that my grandfather, Arthur Seligman, was born in 1881 on the Plaza in Santa Fe. According to Ralph Emerson Twitchell's "Old Santa Fe," published in 1925, Arthur  was born to Bernard and Frances Seligman  in the residence in the rear of the Siligman-Cllever (Seligman Brothers) store. Later this location was advertised as "The end of the Santa Fe Trail" As an infant Arthur made three trips with his mother over the trail. The view in the 1855 photograph is looking at the corner of present day San Francisco and Old Santa Fe Trail. This street has carried the names of "Santa Fe Trail, Seligman Street, Shelby Street, and Old Santa Fe Trail."

   The store is shown above on the right  in what William Stone (New Mexico Them and Nowe) calls  the oldest photo found of Santa Fe. He also noted that Sigmund Seligman, my great uncle, was the first photographer in New Mexico. Before entering the mercantile  business in 1852, he ran a daguerreotype portrait studio for a short time in Santa Fe. To the left is the Exchange Hotel, the only lodgings in Santa Fe at the time of the photo..

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