Mike Lord

Mike Lord

4th generation Santa Fe Gringo.

Saturday, 21 April 2018 01:25

Sandia Mountain Medallion Trees

Medallion trees. They were begun by an unknown person in the 1920s.  Whoever did it took core samples and then placed a medallion of an event that was as old as the tree. The tradition has continued and there are now 84 known trees. The old medallions were covered by a cap which is why they are in such good shape. This medallion was placed in 1928.

Below is a downloadable PDF file showing the location of all of the trees.

This is a part of our Montoya Family History:

Los Ladrones
Friday; August 9, 1907

Dates and Events of the Era
1861 to 1865: Civil War
1846 to 1848: Mexican American War
Sept 9, 1850: NM Became A Territory
1852 to 1942: Don Jose Mauricio Cipriano Chavez Baca (Chavez—Nina’s Father)
Dates Unknown: Cilvestrita Castillo Chavez (Mama Cilvestra—Chavez’ Wife)
1874 to 1965: Juan de Jesus Montoya y Castillo (Nino): Marish Giddings, Territorial Governor; US Grant President
1880 to 1953 Nina: Lewis Wallace, Territorial Governor; Rutherford B. Hayes, President

One of the family tales we often heard from Nino and Nina, and many of the tios and tias was about when los bandidos went to El Rancho del Carrizal. El Rancho de Carrizal was a huge ranch that was originally part of the largest land grant of New Spain. The land grant was granted by El Rey de Espana The King of Spain with a total of 2.2 million acres. Over the years, the land grant had been divided equally among three brothers: Miguel Antonio Chavez; Jose Miguel Chavez; and Antonio Jose Chavez. Miguel Antonio Chavez was Governor of New Mexico when it was 1829 to 1832 and was under Mexican rule. Antonio Jose Chavez was a Congressman representing New Mexico from 182 to 1828 while NM was under Mexican rule.

Several generations later, Don Jose Mauricio Cipriano Chavez Baca (Chavez—my great grandfather) owned El Rancho de Carrizal, the center section of the original land grant—roughly 800,000 acres. The main part of El Carrizal had several houses. The large main house belonged to him and his wife Cilvestrita Castillo Chavez. Attached to the main house was the family chapel. My grandfather (Nino) and grandmother (Nina) lived in a house east of the main house. My grand uncles Martiniano and Telesfor Chavez had homes west of the main house. There were a couple of cousins that had houses that were on the ranch but at a distance. Tio Martiniano and Tio Telesfor and their families were staying at their homes in Magdalena when los bandidos visited El Carrizal.

It was on the vespers of San Lorenzo, August 9, 1907 (Theodore Roosevelt was President). Nino was 33 years old. Nina was 27 years old, they had been married 12 years. Tio Felipe was almost 11 years old. Tio Cilvestre was 9. Tio Adolfo would have been 7 but had died when he was a year old. Tia Maria was 5. Tio Ramon was 3 and Tio Carlos was the baby, he was 5 months old.

It had been cloudy and had rained earlier. They could see another storm rolling in with thunder and lightning.

The family had already eaten supper when two riders approached las casas en el Rancho del Carrizal, the houses at the el Carrizal Ranch. My great-grandfather and grandfather (Nino), welcomed them by name, having recognized them as George Craig and his brother. George had worked for Jose Chavez as a ranch hand. The Criag brothers told them they were mistaken—that they weren’t the Craig brothers. Nino thought this was strange, immediately suspecting something was wrong. The Craigs tied their horses in front of the house. The men chatted in front of the house while my great-grandmother Cilvestrita Castillo Chavez and my grandmother Merenciana Montoya (Nina) went inside to make the visitors some supper.

When supper was ready, Nino excused himself and went to his house next door. Jose Chavez and the Craigs entered and were seated at the table. Jose sat at the head of the table between the two brothers. The women served supper to the two visitors. Since it was dusk, the kerosene lamp on the table had already been lit. Outside, a thunder and rain storm was coming closer and closer.

Nino was suspicious; he kept asking himself, “Why do they deny knowing us?” They had to be up to no good. He went inside his home and got his pistol. He then returned to the main house, but stayed outside, chewing his ever present tobacco, and listening to the conversation inside.

As they were finishing supper, George Craig grabbed Jose Chavez with one hand and pulled his pistol with the other. He hit the lamp to put it out. “We want the gold and money you keep hidden!”, he shouted. Chavez said he didn’t have anything hidden and tried to get away. Craig squeezed the trigger on his pistol. The pistol went off. Jose Chavez fell to the ground. The Craigs ran out to get their horses. As they came out, a bolt of lightning hit. Nino shot George Craig’s brother dead as he was mounting his horse. George Craig also grabbed his horse and tried to get away. As he was riding off, another bolt of lightning hit and lit up the area. Nino again took a shot. He grazed George Craig above the ear. Craig made a successful get away.

Inside the house, there was pandemonium. The children were crying and screaming. Someone had lit a lamp. Jose Chavez was bleeding badly. Nino got him to his bedroom where he, Cilvestrita and Nina cleaned the wound and bound him. Once he knew that Jose Chavez was out of danger, Nino got his horse and saddled him. He told Nina and Cilvestrita that he had to go into town to turn himself in—he had killed a man. Mom (Trinidad) always said that, after that night, Nina was always terrified of thunder and lightning storms. As fate would have it, years later, the night my Mother (Trinidad) was born, was a very stormy night with lots of thunder and lightning!

Although Magdalena was the closest town, Nino had to ride to Socorro, because Magdalena did not have a sheriff. By horseback, this was probably a ride that lasted more than a day. The sheriff took Nino’s statement and told him to go home to be with his family. What he had done, he had done to defend himself and his family. Some say the sheriff was the famous Elfego Baca. He was made famous in the Wide World of Disney episode that told his story. I have not verified this.

Nino went back to El Carrizal. The sheriff got a posse together to look for Craig. I don’t know if the posse found him, but I do know that he was captured. In questioning, he admitted to everything. He said they knew that Chavez didn’t trust banks because he had lost a lot of money when the banks went broke. He kept gold, silver, and money hidden in the house. (We still have the little comoda chest that he used to store his treasures. I have Nino’s pistol). The Craigs were going to take everything of value that they could carry off. They were going to shoot all of the men. Since it was before winter, they had already started hauling wood for burning. The Craig’s were going to put the women and children on the huge wood pile and burn them to death so that there would be no witnesses. If it hadn’t been for Nino, none of us would have ever been born!

Craig was sentenced to prison in Santa Fe. Many years later, when I was a kid in Santa Fe, Nino told me that Craig was our neighbor. We lived next door to the New Mexico State Penitentiary in Santa Fe! One day Nino had my mother Trinidad drive us to the Penitentiary to see if George Craig was still there. As I remember it, he was—about 50 years later.

El Corrido, The Ballad: As I understand it, Norberto M. Abeyta was a teacher and travelling minstrel in the Magdalena—Socorro area. Don Norberto went from town to town and ranch to ranch teaching, writing ballads and entertaining people with his stories and songs. When he heard about what had happened at El Carrizal, he wrote a corridor, a ballad about it because he was a friend of Jose Chavez. My mother, Trinidad, wrote down the ballad, and later typed it so that it wouldn’t be forgotten. I believe she wrote it down from a book of notes that her father Juan Montoya Castillo kept. Following is the corrido. If you would want a copy in Word with an English translation, please send me an email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The picture at the end is El Carrizal where all of this took place. It is said the man in the picture is Tio Casimiro Baca.

Ano de mil nuevsientos.
De mil nuevesientos siete.
Ah que ano tan Desfrasiado.
El que paso antes, de este.

Year of 1900
Of nineteen hundred seven.
Oh what a disgraceful year.
The one that passed before this.

En el nombre de Jesus.
Que es el mesias verdadero. Pidamos de Corazon.
A Jesucristo el primero.
Padre de misericordia.
De todito el mundo entero.

In the name of Jesus.
Who is the true messiah.
We ask from the heart.
First to Jesus Christ .
Father of mercy.
Of the whole world.

A la segunda le pido.
Con versa de Corazon.
Que me de caval sentido.
Para seguir el question.
Por el espirito santo.
Los tres, en esta oracion.
Como no me ha de ajudar.
El sagrado Corazon.

In second place I ask.
With verse from the heart.
May he give me heartfelt _______.
To follow the question.
For the Holy Spirit.
The three in this prayer.
Why would he not help me.
The Sacred Heart.

O san Antonio el patron.
De ti Jamas yo me olvido.
Pues me alcanza este favor.
De ayar todo lo perdido.
Qizas es de este corazon.
Pues yo les pondre un testigo.
Reverendo German Charie.
Porque este es su apelativo.

Oh patron Saint Anthony.
Of you I will never forget.
Because I will obtain this favor.
To find all that is lost.
Perhaps it’s from this heart.
Because I will bear this testimony.
Reverand Herman Charie.
Because this is your last name.

Hoy en dia es la verdad.
Senores como les digo.
Mayoramente en Religion.
Que es la que esta hoy en olvido.
Nade le podrar negar.
A Dios pongo por testigo.
Quando le dijo a san Pedro.
Tienes las llaves te digo.

Today it is the truth.
Gentlemen like I tell you.
Mainly in religion.
Which is what we forget today.
Nobody can deny.
To God I put as witness.
When he said to Saint Peter.
You have the keys I tell you.

Hora sigo, y con amor.
Estoy muy vien convencido.
Vispera de san Lorenzo.
El nueve de agosto ha sido.
Dios me concedio el favor.
De ver con vida, a mi amigo.
Rodiado, de su familia.
En medio de dos enemigos

Now I continue and with love.
I am very much convinced.
Vespers of Saint Lawrence.
They are the 9th of August.
God grant me the favor.
To see with life, my friend.
Circled with his family.
In the middle of his enemies.

Amigo Don Jose Chaves.
Se le rechazan las valas.
Serca de su Martiano.
Pues el no pudo ataJarles.
Atras esta Juan Montoya.
Que supo vien secundarlas.
Callo el primer enemigo.
Y al Segundo faltan alas.

My friend Don Jose Chaves.
Bullets graze him.
Close to his Martiano.
Since he could not intercept.
Behind is Juan Montoya.
Who knew how to back him up.
The first enemy fell.
And the second lacked wings.

Ah que hombres, tan sin conciencia.
Y de tan mal Corazon.
Desolar una familia.
Nomas por una anvicion.
Al infierno fue a parar.
Segun nos dijo Dios.
Murio en pecado mortal.
Nunca quiso confesion.

Oh what men without conscience.
And with such a bad heart.
Dissolve a family.
Just because of a ___________.
To hell he went to stay.
According to what God said.
He died in mortal sin.
He never wanted confession.

El Segundo no estoy sierto.
Como estara en la ocacion
Muy fasil le dijan livre.
Porque hay mucha adulacion.
No se corrije el que yerra.
En la ley de Washington.
Es causa de tanta desgracia.
Que hora sigue en la ocacion.

The second one I am not certain.
How he is on this occasion.
They will probably let him free.
Because there is so much flattery.
They don’t correct those at fault.
In the law of Washington.
It’s such a disgraceful cause.
That follows on this occasion.

Este ano es ano viciesto.
Segun yo estoy informado.
La desian los antiguos.
Yo no estoy desenganado.

This year is a vicious year.
According to what I am told.
The ancient ones said.
I am not disillusioned.

El hombre Don Jocesito.
Sale muy acongojado.
Llega a la plasa del vosque.

The man Don Jocesito.
Leaves very distressed.
He arrives at the town of Vosque.

El avandona su rancho.
Siendo tan interesado.
Se le afligio el Corazon.
De un echo tan inhumano.

He abandons his ranch.
Being so interested.
His heart became afflicted.
Of such an inhuman act.

El alli enpiesa a pensar.
Solito en su pensameinto.
Como avandono mi rancho.
Que depende mi sustento.
San Jose me ha de ajudar.
Y su esposa en este tiempo.
Pues Dios me ha de livertar.
Mi familia es la que siento.

There he starts to think.
Alone in his thoughts.
How can I abandon my ranch.
On which depends my support.
Saint Joseph may help me.
And his wife in this time.
Because God may liberate me.
It’s my family that I feel for.

Cuando el hombre reflejo.
Y vide con reflexion.
Dijo me voy a mi rancho.
Pienso que sera major.
Por que esta plasa del vosque.
Me marchita el Corazon.
Tan solo en estar penzando.
Con mi familia en hunion.

When the man reflected.
And looked with reflection.
He said I’ll go to my ranch.
I believe that would be best.
Because this town of Vosque.
It wilts my heart.
Alone and thinking.
United with my family.

Luego me puse a pensar.
Pa tener satisfaction.
Que lejos esta la lena.
Valgame el Dios que me creo.
Tan numbrosa familia.
Pues fue Dios quien me la dio.
Ya me voi para mi rancho.
Para tener satisfaction.

Then I started to think.
To have satisfaction.
How far is the __________.
God who created me favored me.
With such a numerous family.
Since it was God who gave it to me.
I am going to my ranch.
To have satisfaction.

Govierno de Washington.
Tu a la nacion sovajas.
A que este en pas y en union.
Toda esta india salavaja.
Pero son los suidadanos.
Los que hacen mas grande carga.
Salen como una paloma.
Aunque tengan grande causa.

Government of Washington.
You the nation ____________.
Although we are in peace and unity.
All of these savage Indians.
But it is the ____________.
That make our load bigger.
They leave like a dove.
Although they have great cause.

En los anos anteriores.
Esta nacion navajosa.
Matavan muchos pastores.
Y con traicon enganiosa.
Pero no con tanto orgullo.
Como hora la gente usiosa.
Que quieren viver de plan.
Y de la jente piodosa.

In those early years.
This Navajo nation.
Killed many shepherds.
And with deceitful treachery.
But not with a lot of pride.
Like at this hour the people ___________
That want to live __ __________
And to the pious people.

Ya no se puede aguantar.
En el mundo tanto enredo.
Pero es por la livertad.
Que el govierno al mundo entero.
No pirmitio sullugar.
Y de hay nace el altaner.
Nada quiere respetar.
Ni al Rey supremo de el sielo.

It can not be stood.
In the world so much entanglement.
But it is for liberty.
The government to the whole world.
______________
No one wants to respect
It doesn’t want to respect.
Not even the supreme King of heaven.

Ahora dire y con razon.
Partido, Republicano.
Ya el democrata, murio.
Que la voleta le llama.
Y el gallito se amacho.
Volleta el pueblo. se llama.
Es buen nombre el que quedo.
Nunca perdera la fama.

Now I will say and with reason.
Republican party.
And the democratic dead.
That the votes call.
And the rooster __ _________
The votes of the town call.
It’s a good name that was left.
It will never lose fame.

Causa de estos dos partidos.
Dimana de inimistad.
No se miran como hermanos.
Pues, Dios nos castigara.
Si de su ley avusamos.
Todos con tanta impiedad.
Semos pasto de gusano.
Paque es tanta vanidad.

Because of these two parties.
_______ __ ________
They don’t see each other as brothers.
Since God will punish us.
If we abuse his law.
Everyone with such impiety.
We are pasture to the worm.

Because of such vanity.

Pues hora don Josecito.
Y esta su rancho poblado.
Pongase firme en su crencia.
Dios es quien lo ha livertado.
Ya no le entran ni las valas.
Esta vien desenganiado.
Pero es por intersecion.
De eso esposo inmaculado.
Y ese nino que tomo.
En sus brasos para adorarle.

Because at this hour Don Josecito.
Your ranch is populated.
Stay firm in your faith.
God is the one who liberated you.
Not even the bullets will enter.
You are well disappointed.
But it is for intersession.
Of the immaculate husband.
And the son that he adopted.
In his hands to adore him.

Pues amigo Don Jose.
Hora si estoy contento.
Llo lo vide en su rancho.
Con alegria y contento.
Rodiado de su familia.
Y de vecino Don Celso.
Y para el lado del oriente,
Don Juan Montoya su yerno.

Because friend Don Jose.
Now I am happy.
I saw you in your ranch.
With happiness and contentment.
Surrounded by your family.
Any your neighbor Don Celso.
And to the east side.
Don Juan Montoya your son-in-law.

Martiano, y Telesfor.
Por el lado del poniente.
Van de seninelas dos.
Ah que hijos tan competentes.
Los resquarda el Redentor.
Y los haga hombres valientes.
Para desfender su honor.
En medio de sus parientes.

Martiano and Telesfor.
To the west side.
They both go as sentinals.
Oh what competent sons.
The Redeemer guard them.
And make them valiant men.
To defend your honor.
In the middle of their relatives.

Ya me empieso a despedir.
Ya paso la noche buena.
Hoyga Da. Silvestrita.
Para mi mujer tan Buena.
Como le fue con el Judas.
Cuando le pidio la sena.

I start to take my leave.
The night passed well.
Listen. Dona Silvestrita.
To me a very good lady.
How did it go with the Judas.
When he asked you for super.

Que moneda le entrego.
Con una pistola llena.
Si a su esposo no mato.
Es una cosa tan Buena.
Que la Virgen lo livro.
Y no crea en, mas exena

What coin did he give.
With a full pistol.
Since he didn’t kill your husband.
It is a good thing.
That the Virgin liberated him.
And don’t believe very __________.

Hoyga Da. Silvestrita.
Como estava en el momento.
Con su amable Merenciana.
La misma aflicion un tienpo.
Pues a san Joce aclamavan.
Las dos en un mismo tienpo pienso.
A la Virgen los livrara.
A todos un mismo tienpo.

Listen Dona Silvestrita.
How was the moment.
With your kind Merenciana.
The same affliction in time.
Because you acclaimed Saint Joseph.
To both at the same time I believe.
To the Virgin will liberate you.
To all at the same time.

Pues amigo Don Jose.
Ya con esta me despido.
Algo a su coresponder.
Hoy don Norberto su amigo.
Colmado de veneficios.
De su familia le digo.

Well friend Don Jose.
With this one I will depart.
Something to reciprocate.
Today, don Norberto your friend.
To shower you with blessings.
Of your family I tell you.

Tuesday, 10 April 2018 01:07

Tia Maria Lopez - By Gloria Roybal

Tia Maria Lopez, 1947.

This picture was taken by a photographer as she was herding her families goats on Cerro Gordo Rd. The actual picture shows the herd to the right.

The family was unaware of this beautiful picture until the photographer died and it ran on the front page of the New Mexican in 1992. My grandmother and her sister couldn’t believe their eyes when she opened the paper. “Mi hermana Marieita” she said in disbelief. It is one of my favorite pictures.

Maria’s husband was Lorenzo Lopez who built the Capilla de San Isidro which is to the right of this picture.

This little recipe book was published in 1941 by Doña Eloise Delgado de Stewart in honor of her mother, Doña Modestita Lopez de Delgado, and her sisters, Petrita Delgado de Lucero, Lencha Delgado, Lala Delgado de Rodriguez, and Josefa Delgado Kirby.  Click on the link below for a downloadable pdf file of the entire cookbook.  It's a large file, so give it several minutes to download.

 

I grew up with acequias.  This photo is of my grandfather, Patricio Rodriguez, plowing his farm on Santa Fe's Upper Canyon Road in 1937.  His son Bernardo and his daughter Rosarito Cruz (my mother) are sowing seed behind him.  Patricio Rodriguez was mayordomo of both the Cerro Gordo acequia (no longer in use) and the Canyon Road acequia.  My brother tends the acequia on Canyon Road today.

Gloria Roybal
Granddaughter of Patricio Rodriguez.

EncarnacionChonita Rodriguez 1992

My grandmother, Encarnacion (Chonita) Rodriguez, at Cristo Rey church, shortly before her death in 1992,  She attended Mass every Sunday.

This is a downloadable article about all of the different locations in Santa Fe that housed U.S. Government weather monitoring stations.  Lots of good photos.  Download link below.

Sunday, 21 January 2018 20:33

The Lost Cellar on La Vereda

When Santa Fe's Fischer Brewery was built in the early 1860s, it included a large underground stone lined cellar used to keep beer cold.  There was a man-made pond just off the Santa Fe river below the brewery where ice was harvested during the winter and placed in the cellar.  In 1890, Fischer financed an ice plant, which caused financial difficulties, causing the brewery to close in 1896.

In 1906, my great-grandfather, Alois Renehan, purchased the brewery, demolished it, and had a large house he named The Willows built on the site.  For the next 35 years the cellar was used for storage, including the equipment needed to maintain an apple orchard next to the main house.  There is a family story that the bar from the Plaza Hotel was stored there while the hotel was being remodeled.  The hotel burned down in 1926.  During this time, he also built the La Vereda complex that is there today.  After Renehan's death in 1928, my grandfather moved into the big house and continued to use the cellar.  In 1942, my father recalled taking all metal objects that were in the cellar out and donating them to an iron war drive.  He said that the bar was still there.  After the war, the road over the cellar was sinking, so my grandfather had the cellar filled and walled up the entrance.  That wall, pictured above, still exists.  As a boy, I remember a depression next to our house which I was told was a ventilation shaft for the cellar.  I was also told to stay away from it.

Today, all traces of the cellar are gone except for the walled-up entrance.  I've often wondered whatever happened to the Palace Hotel bar.  It must have been something! 

 

 

Fisher Brewing 1890 cellar

Fischer Brewery, 1890, showing location of the cellar

 

Dee Lord Jr La Vereda 1938 small

 

My Father, Dee Lord, in 1938.  The ventilation shaft for the cellar is on the hill over his right shoulder

 

 

Tuesday, 03 October 2017 21:26

The Birthday Party

In 1954, my brother David and I were invited to Suzy Armentrout's 7th birthday party.  We lived on La Vereda then and Suzy hung out with me, my brother David, and Larry Lloyd.  We did everything together, from playing army in the arroyos to putting on our Davy Crockett hats and stalking game to building roads for our Matchbox cars and trucks.  The one time I remember playing girl stuff with her was when David and I were having a tug of war with Suzy's favorite doll and the doll came apart, spilling stuffing all over the room.  After that, it was strictly boy activities.  The only times I remember her in a dress was on school days and at her birthday party.  We all went to the brand new Acequia Madre elementary school.  Suzy told me recently that two of her birthday gifts were Davy Crockett outfits for her Ginny doll.

Pictured in the photo are:  Standing, Larry Lloyd, Mike Lord, Suzy Armentrout, and Patsy Burtrum.  Seated are Rosina (?) and her sisters, David Lord, and Linda Lloyd.  My mom thought it would be cute to dress David and me in matching outfits, which was the beginning of my initiation into the Peefee world (for more about the word Peefee, go here.)  And the hats!  They came from Los Niños.  They don't make 'em like that any more.

What I love most about this photo is the mix of cultures.  We were white kids living in a Hispano neighborhood and we were all able to get along just fine.  Our parents taught us that we were no different than anyone else and, at this age, it never occured to us that we were. This is probably the most important thing I learned as a child growing up in Santa Fe and a lesson that I've passed on to my children.

Tuesday, 12 September 2017 20:11

Mi Familia - By Consuelo Chavez

The beautiful little girl is Angie Sosaya Biddle. eldest child of Augustin and Victoria Roybal Sosaya. Many of you know Victoria Murphy. Her mother, Monica Sosaya Halford, was their daughter. Victoria Sosaya's older sister was Nicolasa Roybal Chavez, mother of Fray Angelico, Martha, Nora (my mother), Cuate, Adela, Maria Consuelo, Eugenio, FabIan Jr., Antonio and Jose. Jose is the only one of the ten children still living!

The pretty lady to the right in the picture is Victoria. She and their older sister Eva, were the prettiest of the 4 Roybal girls. They were both tall and slender. My grandmother Nicolasa is sitting with her back to the camera. She was barely 4'10" and had a very small frame. The 2nd oldest of the sisters was Aurelia Roybal King. She was married to George King. You got it...he later owned a bar in Santa Fe.

This picture was taken in front if the Roybal house in Wagon Mound in 1915.

Who is that little boy pushing a wheel barrel?  Why that is Fabian and Nicolasa's eldest child....none other than Manuel Ezekiel....aka Fray Angelico Chavez OFM.

Friday, 16 June 2017 15:36

My Father - By Gloria Mendoza

It's hard for me to write about my parents. As soon as I think of them my tears flow. Tears of love and gratefulness. I want to share with you about a man who took his role as a father and husband very seriously.

My Dad was born in La Cienega, was one of 13 children born to Facundo Romero and Aurora Narvaiz Romero. My grandfather died when he and a son lost their way on the mesa as a blizzard hit and they lost direction...they froze to death. My grandmother abandoned her 13 children and my father came home from the service to raise his siblings. He married Lydia Romero from Santa Fe. She was 17 years old so he legally became her guardian in order to legally get married.

He only had a 3rd grade education and my mother an eighth grade education. My father did not go to school because he could not speak English and his teacher was physically and verbally abusive to him. So he stayed home helping his Dad work on the small ranch they had in La Cienega. They all lived in a two room house. I always wondered how they managed that. I got to see their small home, an acequia running next to their little home. Some of His siblings lived with him and my mom until they were old enough to go on their own. Most left during the depression to get married or go work in California.

My Father worked as a Milkman for Slade's Dairy which was located in the Pen Road area. He delivered milk all the way to Chama. He then went to work at the loading docks that were located where Dunkin' Donuts is. He worked at night. I remember my brother and I skating from one end of the dock to the other when Mom would go take Dad dinner. My Mom was just learning to drive so it was a little scary, because she was not that good at turning into the docks and would always bump into the dock. Needless to say, the car had a lot of dents.

Dad then went to work for Southern Union Gas Company. He retired from there. My Mom was deceased and wasn't there to celebrate his retirement...I took her place. My father was a wonderful husband. We all took care of Mom when she got real sick from Breast Cancer, her radiation treatments, her removal of her breast and her long road of pain and suffering. I quit working to care for her 24/7 until she succumbed to that horrible disease. My father, with my help, raised 3 young children left at home. My oldest brother and I were married. My siblings never got over losing their mother and all three died at very young ages. They all lived with me at some point of their lives. I tried my best to take my Moms place but it's not the same for them.

My Father taught my sons how to plant, to butcher, to learn survival skills with using the land. He was my rock as I was his. We leaned on each other. My love for him is eternal.he taught me the meaning of inner strength and importance of family. For that I will always be grateful. He was always there for me and my family. I miss hugging and kissing him. He lived with me and I slept on the floor at the hospital for two weeks until he died. Happy Fathers Day Dad! We will all meet again and be together, me you, mom, Geneva, Donald and Trudy. I so love you. Such an amazing man.

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