Monday, 12 March 2018 20:01

Farming on Upper Canyon Road - By Gloria Roybal

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I grew up with acequias.  This photo is of my grandfather, Patricio Rodriguez, plowing his farm on Santa Fe's Upper Canyon Road in 1937.  His son Bernardo and his daughter Rosarito Cruz (my mother) are sowing seed behind him.  Patricio Rodriguez was mayordomo of both the Cerro Gordo acequia (no longer in use) and the Canyon Road acequia.  My brother tends the acequia on Canyon Road today.

Gloria Roybal
Granddaughter of Patricio Rodriguez.

EncarnacionChonita Rodriguez 1992

My grandmother, Encarnacion (Chonita) Rodriguez, at Cristo Rey church, shortly before her death in 1992,  She attended Mass every Sunday.

This is a downloadable article about all of the different locations in Santa Fe that housed U.S. Government weather monitoring stations.  Lots of good photos.  Download link below.

Sunday, 21 January 2018 20:33

The Lost Cellar on La Vereda

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When Santa Fe's Fischer Brewery was built in the early 1860s, it included a large underground stone lined cellar used to keep beer cold.  There was a man-made pond just off the Santa Fe river below the brewery where ice was harvested during the winter and placed in the cellar.  In 1890, Fischer financed an ice plant, which caused financial difficulties, causing the brewery to close in 1896.

In 1906, my great-grandfather, Alois Renehan, purchased the brewery, demolished it, and had a large house he named The Willows built on the site.  For the next 35 years the cellar was used for storage, including the equipment needed to maintain an apple orchard next to the main house.  There is a family story that the bar from the Plaza Hotel was stored there while the hotel was being remodeled.  The hotel burned down in 1926.  During this time, he also built the La Vereda complex that is there today.  After Renehan's death in 1928, my grandfather moved into the big house and continued to use the cellar.  In 1942, my father recalled taking all metal objects that were in the cellar out and donating them to an iron war drive.  He said that the bar was still there.  After the war, the road over the cellar was sinking, so my grandfather had the cellar filled and walled up the entrance.  That wall, pictured above, still exists.  As a boy, I remember a depression next to our house which I was told was a ventilation shaft for the cellar.  I was also told to stay away from it.

Today, all traces of the cellar are gone except for the walled-up entrance.  I've often wondered whatever happened to the Palace Hotel bar.  It must have been something! 

 

 

Fisher Brewing 1890 cellar

Fischer Brewery, 1890, showing location of the cellar

 

Dee Lord Jr La Vereda 1938 small

 

My Father, Dee Lord, in 1938.  The ventilation shaft for the cellar is on the hill over his right shoulder

 

 

Wednesday, 08 November 2017 17:35

El Vaquerito

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I've always wanted to and was encouraged to share my experience growing up in Santa Fe and environs of the Pecos wilderness during my childhood. In writing it I chose a child's voice in this story because of the innocence and awe that we all have, with just a bit shamanistic wisdom.

You can download the entire story below.

Wednesday, 18 October 2017 07:12

Canyon Road: The Lay of the Land

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Tuesday, 03 October 2017 21:26

The Birthday Party

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In 1954, my brother David and I were invited to Suzy Armentrout's 7th birthday party.  We lived on La Vereda then and Suzy hung out with me, my brother David, and Larry Lloyd.  We did everything together, from playing army in the arroyos to putting on our Davy Crockett hats and stalking game to building roads for our Matchbox cars and trucks.  The one time I remember playing girl stuff with her was when David and I were having a tug of war with Suzy's favorite doll and the doll came apart, spilling stuffing all over the room.  After that, it was strictly boy activities.  The only times I remember her in a dress was on school days and at her birthday party.  We all went to the brand new Acequia Madre elementary school.  Suzy told me recently that two of her birthday gifts were Davy Crockett outfits for her Ginny doll.

Pictured in the photo are:  Standing, Larry Lloyd, Mike Lord, Suzy Armentrout, and Patsy Burtrum.  Seated are Rosina (?) and her sisters, David Lord, and Linda Lloyd.  My mom thought it would be cute to dress David and me in matching outfits, which was the beginning of my initiation into the Peefee world (for more about the word Peefee, go here.)  And the hats!  They came from Los Niños.  They don't make 'em like that any more.

What I love most about this photo is the mix of cultures.  We were white kids living in a Hispano neighborhood and we were all able to get along just fine.  Our parents taught us that we were no different than anyone else and, at this age, it never occured to us that we were. This is probably the most important thing I learned as a child growing up in Santa Fe and a lesson that I've passed on to my children.

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