Thursday, 05 January 2017 14:11

New Year's Celebration in the 1950s - By Gloria Mendoza

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Thinking back to New Year's Eve when I was young. New Year's Eve in the morning my mother would wake everyone up to clean house. Once done her and her sister would start making food, finger foods, finger sandwiches, dips, Posole & chile, cakes and other goodies. Then they would send my Dad for beer, wine, whiskey and Champagne. My Mom had a little savings just for this occasion. We used to look for change in the couches and all over the house to help her "change" savings. Tonight was a very special night. We had to be in bed by 10:00 p.m. We had to rush and get everything done by then.....Why?......because people, mostly relatives and friends were coming to sing Las Mananitas to my Dad...after all it is the Feast Day of Los Manueles....my Dad's name was Manuel. They would come serenading at our doors and windows singing and playing guitars and violins. We would wake up, greet them, feed them and then the music, dancing and drinking began. My mother served a special drink to the women (her and my Aunt made it up) it was called greenie. Lime sherbert, ginger ale and vodka in a punch bowl. It was a house full of people, singing and they would stay until close to noon time on New Year's Day. All the kids slept on the floor of our bedrooms. Talk about celebrating. Now my family got used to coming over and playing board games for New Year's. We enjoy this better than any other type of celebration. My kids and grandkids are smart.....they don't drink and drive. Always a designated driver if they do drink. I wish you all a wonderful year and slow down on your drinking if you are going to drink. Be sociable.......don't get all locos and locas......lol. HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!!!!!!!

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  • Comment Link ed Saiz Saturday, 07 January 2017 14:47 posted by ed Saiz

    Mike, great article, I would think that a good time was had by all in attendance. Thank you for what you did on the Tesuque Church.

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